Hospital

Russian opposition politician Navalny in hospital after suspected poisoning: spokeswoman

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny is in a serious condition in a Siberian hospital after suffering severe symptoms of what his spokeswoman on Thursday said she believed was a deliberate poisoning.



Alexei Navalny standing in front of a crowd: FILE PHOTO: Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny takes part in a rally to mark the 5th anniversary of opposition politician Boris Nemtsov's murder and to protest against proposed amendments to the country's constitution, in Moscow


© Reuters/Shamil Zhumatov
FILE PHOTO: Russian opposition politician Alexei Navalny takes part in a rally to mark the 5th anniversary of opposition politician Boris Nemtsov’s murder and to protest against proposed amendments to the country’s constitution, in Moscow

Navalny, 44, is unconscious, in intensive care and on an artificial lung ventilator, his spokeswoman, Kira Yarmysh, said on social media.

“We assume that Alexei was poisoned with something mixed into his tea. It was the only thing that he drank in the morning. Doctors say the toxin was absorbed faster through the hot liquid. Alexei is now unconscious,” Yarmysh said.



a tree in front of a building: A view shows a hospital where Russian opposition leader Navalny was admitted, in Omsk


© Reuters/ALEXEY MALGAVKO
A view shows a hospital where Russian opposition leader Navalny was admitted, in Omsk

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BK Nursing Home-Turned Overflow Hospital Welcomes Back Tenants

CROWN HEIGHTS, BROOKLYN — A long-vacant hospital in Crown Heights that was transformed into a nursing home late last year has finally welcomed its first tenants after a months-long delay during the coronavirus crisis.

The 280,000-square-foot nursing home on Buffalo Avenue, known as the Brooklyn Center, had offered up its space in March for COVID-19 patients as part of a state-led initiative to find overflow sites as the New York’s hospitals filled up at the height of the pandemic.

But Tuesday, as the city rebounds from the coronavirus crisis, it was able to return to its original plan of being a home for 281 nursing home residents.

“To enjoy all of the offerings, as well as the spacious and luxury of the new Brooklyn Center is something that our residents and their families have been waiting for a long time,” said Elie Schiff, administrator at the facility. “At the same

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L.A. Children’s Hospital sued over stem-cell freezer failure

A California couple sued Children’s Hospital Los Angeles on Wednesday over a freezer malfunction that resulted in the loss of blood stem cells from 56 child patients, including their son.

The hospital apologized for the problem a year ago with its cryogenic freezer and said at the time that no child’s health was put in jeopardy because of the failure.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of the boy, identified only as “EF,” who suffers from neuroblastoma, a rare cancer. Stem-cell treatment is vital for his condition and the loss of his cells cut off a “lifeline and a safety net for EF and his family,” according to the lawsuit.

The complaint alleges negligence, medical malpractice and breach of contract on the part of hospital officials. It seeks unspecified monetary damages.

“We are committed to working toward a positive outcome for all involved,” the hospital said in a statement Wednesday.

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Shinzo Abe’s health under question following hospital visits

Aug. 20 (UPI) — Japanese ruling party politicians are dismissing speculation that Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is ill following unexplained hospital visits.

Opposition lawmakers, meanwhile, are demanding transparency after a local press report suggested Abe showed symptoms of haematemesis and was seen in July vomiting blood in his official residence.

Fumio Kishida, chairman of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party’s Policy Research Council, and Economics Minister Hiroshi Kajiyama met with Abe on Thursday, Kyodo News and NHK reported.

Kishida said he told the prime minister to take better care and go on break if possible. Kishida also said Abe thanked him and said he is in “good shape,” according to reports.

Kishida did not confirm whether Abe was sick but said the prime minister may have “accumulated fatigue.”

Earlier in the week, Abe had dismissed questions about his health, according to the Asahi Shimbun.

Abe had been treated for more than

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Royal Gwent Hospital: Patient found dead in shower after two days

The Royal Gwent Hospital was at the centre of the Wales' Covid-19 outbreakImage copyright
J Thomas/Geograph

Image caption

Mr McLean’s family said they were happy with the care he received at the Royal Gwent

A man who died from a heroin overdose in a hospital shower room was not found by staff for two days after he went missing, an inquest heard.

Inpatient Rory McLeod, 52, from Newport, left the ward at Royal Gwent Hospital on 11 April 2019 for a cigarette but never came back.

Staff searched the hospital but he was found two days later after a cleaner raised the alarm.

Aneurin Bevan Health Board said there had been a “thorough investigation”.

A report by the board found the shower he was in did not have a sign to show it had been continually occupied, and if there was it “might have alerted staff”.

The Newport inquest heard Mr McLeod, a landscape gardener, had a history of alcohol and drug

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Princess Alexandra Hospital sorry for LGBT ‘mental disorder’ poster

Princess Alexandra in HarlowImage copyright
Google

Image caption

The Princess Alexandra Hospital, in Harlow, Essex, has removed the poster which was in its urgent treatment centre

A hospital has apologised for a poster which listed “LGBTG” as a “mental health disorder”.

The Princess Alexandra Hospital in Harlow, Essex, has removed the laminated sign which was on display in its urgent treatment centre.

A spokesman said action was “being taken to understand how this was displayed”.

“We assure all our patients that the view implied by the poster is not the view of the trust,” he said.

The hospital’s deputy chief executive Trevor Smith said: “We apologise for the offence caused by a poster displayed in our hospital.

“The poster was removed immediately and action is being taken to understand how this was displayed.

‘Painful perceptions’

“We regret the concern this situation has caused and we assure all our patients that the view implied

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Pandemic pushes expansion of ‘hospital-at-home’ treatment

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Nurse practitioner Sadie Paez uses a stethoscope to listen to the chest of William Merry, who is recovering from pneumonia at his home, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Ipswich, Mass. As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

AP

As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

Across the U.S., “hospital at home” programs are taking off amid the pandemic, thanks to communications technology, portable medical equipment and teams of doctors, nurses, X-ray techs and paramedics. That’s reducing strains on medical centers and easing patients’ fears.

The programs represent a small slice of the roughly 35 million U.S. hospitalizations each year, but they are growing fast

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Japan’s leader visits hospital, raising health concerns

TOKYO (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe went to a hospital on Monday for what Japanese media said was a regular health checkup, although the visit generated renewed concerns about his health.



FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2020, file photo, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe walks off after delivering a speech during a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, in Hiroshima, western Japan. Abe went to a hospital Monday, Aug. 17, for what Japanese media reported was a regular checkup, although the visit regenerated ongoing worries about his health. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Aug. 6, 2020, file photo, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe walks off after delivering a speech during a ceremony to mark the 75th anniversary of the bombing at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, in Hiroshima, western Japan. Abe went to a hospital Monday, Aug. 17, for what Japanese media reported was a regular checkup, although the visit regenerated ongoing worries about his health. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

Videos of Abe being driven in a car to Keio University Hospital in Tokyo on Monday morning were widely shown on Japanese TV news reports. Public broadcaster NHK TV later showed him leaving the hospital at about 6 p.m.



A car, left, carrying Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, arrives at Keio University Hospital in Tokyo, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. Prime Minister Abe went to a hospital Monday for what Japanese media reported was a regular checkup, although the visit regenerated ongoing worries about his health.(Kyodo News via AP)


© Provided

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In-hospital Start of Sacubitril-Valsartan Cost-Effective in HFrEF

Starting sacubitril-valsartan (Entresto) in patients hospitalized with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is not only cost-effective, but actually cost-saving, as compared with outpatient initiation, a new analysis shows.

From a healthcare system perspective, initiation of sacubitril-valsartan during hospitalization saved $452 per year compared with continuing enalapril (Vasotec), and $811 per year compared with initiation at 2 months after hospitalization.

Compared with continuation of enalapril indefinitely, switching patients to sacubitril-valsartan during their HF admission was associated with a cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained of $21,532.

“On a short-term basis, initiation of this drug in the hospital both saves money and improves patients’ lives, but even considering a lifetime commitment to the medication, it still offers good value for the money,” said Thomas A. Gaziano, MD, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, lead author of the analysis published online August 12 in JAMA Cardiology.  

As modeled in this study,

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Japan PM has hospital check-up amid concerns over possible fatigue

By Yoshifumi Takemoto and Kiyoshi Takenaka

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe underwent a medical check-up in hospital on Monday, a government source said, amid concern voiced by a top official that the premier could be suffering fatigue from handling the coronavirus pandemic.

Abe, Japan’s longest-serving prime minister, returned home after about seven-and-a-half hours in hospital, Kyodo news agency said.

The agency quoted a source at Abe’s office as saying “Abe underwent various check-ups since he had the whole day (free) on a weekday”, stressing that nothing was wrong with the prime minister.

Health Minister Katsunobu Kato, a close aide, said he understood it was a regular check-up and he was “not at all” worried about Abe’s health.

“All I know is from media reports. And I understand it was reported as a regular check-up,” Kato told reporters.

Abe gets a regular check-up twice a year, with his

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