Health Care : NPR

Health Care : NPR

Health Care The state of health care, health insurance, new medical research, disease prevention, and drug treatments. Interviews, news, and commentary from NPR’s correspondents. Subscribe to podcasts.

Workers use a tape measure mark spaces six feet apart for people to wait in line safely as they convert the outdoor plaza in front of Zaytinya, one of Chef José Andres’ restaurants in Washington, D.C. Efforts to contain the coronavirus are affecting blood donor drives and supplies.

Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images


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Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

MedStar Washington Hospital Center’s “ready room” in Washington, D.C., has mostly been used to house emergency supplies — but some storage carts have been moved out to make way for patient assessment stations.

Ryan Kellman/NPR


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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Are U.S. Hospitals Ready?

A couple wear face masks as they visit Buckingham Palace in London on Saturday. After criticism for responding slowly, the United Kingdom has urged the public to avoid unnecessary contact.

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Frank Augstein/AP

U.K. Steps Up Coronavirus Prevention, But Its Hospitals Have Already Been Strained

A member of the custodial staff at Los Angeles’ Union Station, taking extra care in the waiting area — all part of enhanced cleaning efforts at major transit hubs in response to COVID-19.

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Michelle Schaeffer, director of Syringa Clinics in Idaho, says her facility and an adjoining hospital have about a month’s supply of masks left.

Kirk Siegler/NPR


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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Rural Hospitals Brace For Coronavirus

The U.S. Strategic National Stockpile was started in 1999 to prepare for certain threats to national security. It includes about $8 billion worth of vaccines, medicine, protective gear, ventilators and other kinds of medical equipment.

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Strategic National Stockpile/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Why Even A Huge Medical Stockpile Will Be Of Limited Use Against COVID-19

Ventilators can be a temporary bridge to recovery — many patients in critical care who need them for help breathing get better.

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Taechit Taechamanodom/Getty Images

As The Pandemic Spreads, Will There Be Enough Ventilators?

Tom Cooper, Nashville General Hospital’s supply chain director, inspects a box of N95 respirators. The hospital is among a small group of pilot sites now sharing data about the inventory of its protective equipment with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Blake Farmer/ WPLN

“Bottom line, it’s going to get worse,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said of the coronavirus outbreak in the United States. Fauci testified Wednesday at a hearing of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform.

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The test for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 isn’t simple, like the ones for the flu, strep or pregnancy. The current kits are configured more for a research lab than a hospital.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Early symptoms of COVID-19 are much the same as those of the flu or a cold. Don’t panic. Call your doctor to check in, if you’re worried, but treating mild or moderate symptoms at home until you’re well will protect you and help stop the spread of whatever you have.

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You Have A Fever And A Dry Cough. Now What?

The Young Israel synagogue of New Rochelle is at the center of a new “containment area” announced by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo Tuesday.

New York Governor’s Office


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New York Governor’s Office

Sacramento County includes the University of California, Davis Medical Center, which housed the first U.S. case of a patient getting the new coronavirus through community spread.

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Patrick Mouzawak/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In the 1960s, demographers warned that we were on track for a global population explosion. That’s not exactly what happened.

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moodboard – Mike Watson/Getty Images

The Bomb That Didn’t Explode: Why Our Fears About Population Growth Didn’t Come True

Remote work is not an option for home, health and nursing aides, who look after some of the most vulnerable, often themselves without health insurance and earning little.

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Marie Bertrand/Getty Images

‘Who’s Going To Help Them?’: Caregivers Brace For The Spread Of Coronavirus

After a coronavirus test came back positive on a patient who had been treated at NorthBay VacaValley Hospital in Vacaville, Calif., in February, about 100 NorthBay workers were sent into self-quarantine for 14 days.

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Nurse Jeff Gates prepares to assess another patient in UW Medicine’s drive-through coronavirus testing clinic in Seattle.

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Jon Hamilton/NPR

Seattle Health Care System Offers Drive-Through Coronavirus Testing For Workers

President Trump signs an $8.3 billion emergency spending bill in the White House Friday. That’s significantly more than he originally requested from Congress.

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Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Where That $8.3 Billion In U.S. Coronavirus Funding Will And Won’t Go

“Access to testing is really the major tool we have right now to fight this new coronavirus,” says Dr. Keith Jerome, who runs a University of Washington lab in Seattle that can now test for the virus.

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Jonathan Hamilton/NPR

When Coronavirus Struck Seattle, This Lab Was Ready To Start Testing

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