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Flywheel Sports Will Close, Adding to Fitness Chain Wreckage

(Bloomberg) — Flywheel Sports Inc., the operator of spin boutiques beloved by fitness-obsessed city dwellers, filed for bankruptcy with plans to go out of business after the coronavirus shut down its studios.



Flywheel's Chelsea Studio in New York.


© Photographer: Paul Zimmerman/Getty Images
Flywheel’s Chelsea Studio in New York.

The fitness chain’s Chapter 7 petition filed in New York late Monday estimates as much as $100 million in liabilities and no more than $50 million in assets. Flywheel will use the court-supervised process to gather and sell assets so it can pay off debts and close its locations.

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New York-based Flywheel offered in-studio and on-demand cycling and strength classes across U.S. cities including Boston, Chicago, Washington and Seattle. Its filing comes a day after its former suitor, Town Sports International Holdings Inc., the parent of New York Sports Clubs, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Both chains are among fitness centers that suffered after shelter-at-home

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“To all our loyal members please know that I will fight and make this right,” Henrey said on his Facebook page Aug. 31. “[I] remained because I felt our members needed it and I needed to support my family.” 

The warnings began on June 3 when Ben Hernandez, a Buellton code enforcement officer, visited the gym and told Henrey his gym was not allowed to be open, according to court records. 

Henrey acknowledged the warning but replied that his gym was an essential business because he also sells masks, gloves and other personal protective equipment. He said he has taken measures that include spacing equipment at least 6 feet apart, taking members’ temperatures, requiring face masks and making members sign a liability waiver. 

Additionally, acting on advice from his attorney, Henrey told Hernandez his gym was “not open to the public and members only,” according to the lawsuit. 

Officials contacted

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L.A. Surge Hospital for coronavirus patients to close in June

The state-funded Los Angeles Surge Hospital, which has seen relatively few patients since it opened five weeks ago to treat an anticipated overflow of COVID-19 cases, will close by June 30, officials said Wednesday.

In addition, emergency medical facilities that had been set up throughout the state will begin reducing operations, according to the California Health and Human Services Agency and Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

The Los Angeles Surge Hospital, located on the grounds of the shuttered St. Vincent Medical Center near downtown Los Angeles, was set up to handle as many as 270 patients a day. But the hospital has never had more than 25 patients at a time, officials said.

When the coronavirus crisis began and officials feared hospitals would be overrun, the state signed a six-month, $16-million lease with Verity Health System, which owned St. Vincent and had declared bankruptcy.

The state also paid healthcare companies

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China Pledged to Build a New Hospital in 10 Days. It’s Close.

WUHAN, China — People desperate for treatment started descending on a new hospital that was mostly built in just 10 days to help cope with the outbreak of the new coronavirus in the central city of Wuhan on Monday.

Construction workers in hard hats, medical staff in hazmat suits, and men and women in army fatigues scrambled around the dusty site on Monday afternoon, dodging moving trucks, excavators and cranes. Workers were still trying to finish construction on the Huoshenshan Hospital — a name that means “Fire God Mountain” — even as the facility prepared to accept its first batch of patients, the official state broadcaster, China Central Television, reported.

[Read: How to survive an outbreak.]

Xue Ying, a resident of Wuhan, had driven to the new hospital hoping to find help for his increasingly unwell cousin. But city officials and signs on checkpoints have said the hospital would

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