pandemic

Chicago Startup Predicts The Future Of Fitness Post Pandemic

The $4.5 trillion global wellness economy is being transformed before our eyes. Those that invest in the trends that stick and dominate will be significantly healthier, at least financially. There are some clear winners we’ve seen during the pandemic, but based on market trends and consumer feedback, the landscape continues to shift. 

To help shine a light on how wellness consumers, fitness professionals and gym owners see the future of fitness once the dust settles, I met with Jeana Anderson Cohen, the founder and CEO of aSweatLife. Her firm has had a finger on the pulse on the latest fitness trends over the past few years thanks to its annual State of Fitness survey. 

Given the enormous disruption of the fitness industry resulting from the pandemic-related lock-downs and social distancing, aSweatLife recently conducted The State of Fitness During the Global Covid-19

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How to safely go to the dentist during the pandemic

My tongue first detected the problem when it caught a sharp edge on my teeth: A hefty hunk of my back right molar was missing. I’m not sure how it happened, but it meant that after months of avoiding any sort of physical closeness with other people, I needed to brave the dentist’s chair.

With the pandemic raging across the United States, the office I entered in Alexandria, Virginia, looked very different from the one I had visited months before. Two cups of pens sat on the receptionist’s desk, one for “clean” writing utensils and the other for those recently used. A plexiglass partition divided me from the rest of the office behind, and everyone—myself included—donned a mask.

Dental work is a uniquely risky environment for spreading SARS-CoV-2, since medical practitioners work face-to-face with open-mouthed patients for extended periods of time. “We, unfortunately, work in a danger zone,” says Mark

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Baptist Health offers more resources to workers during pandemic

Since April, Baptist Health has offered its staff several mental health options in the midst of the pandemic.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla — Months into the pandemic, health care workers continue to fight COVID-19. As they fight the virus, though, who is taking care of them?

Baptist Health has continued to offer several mental health resources for its staff. The latest installment of the hospital’s Wellness and Resilience Offerings is what’s called Recharge and Refresh Rooms. The rooms have massage chairs, soft lighting and chaplains are available to talk to.

“I think it’s just a nice balance and desensitizing just the amount of stimulation that they get throughout the day, through noise and light and people,” Lisa Solwold, Staff Chaplain for Wolfson Children’s Hospital, said. “It’s just a nice retreat even if it’s just for a few moments.”

Since April, Baptist has offered its staff several mental health options, including a 24/7

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Free health classes to maintain diet and exercise amid pandemic

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WETM) – For those that may feel stuck in their health journies amid the pandemic, you can now take a free virtual class that helps with exercising and food nutrition.

The Center of Community Health and Prevention in partnership with Wilmot Cancer Institute under the University of Rochester are providing a program that empowers participants to make diet and healthy lifestyle changes. The free eight week zoom-focused program helps with lowering the risk of chronic diseases and cancer.

The program was in-person until the COVID-19 pandemic hit.

The Regional Program Manager, Sarah Merritt, said the zoom meeting helps with socializing too.

“The need for something to do virtually that promotes activity is huge,” said Merritt. “When you’re with a group of people, especially for 8 weeks you kind of grow a bond. So there’s a big social aspect to these classes, and I found that to be just

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Millions of Brits face agonising wait to see the dentist after 10m appointments delayed by coronavirus pandemic

MILLIONS of Brits face an agonising wait to see the dentist after an estimated 10million appointments were delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The British Dental Association (BDA) has warned it could take months to clear the backlog with campaigners claiming the coronavirus crisis has been disastrous for children’s oral health.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

The BDA says it could take months to clear the backlog of patients

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The BDA says it could take months to clear the backlog of patientsCredit: Reuters

Many surgeries reopened last month after being shut during lockdown but strict rules mean they can only deal with just a few patients a day.

The BDA estimates more than 10million check-ups and treatments, such as fillings, were put on hold during the time surgeries were forced to close due to Covid-19.

Those patients who have been able to get an appointment now face charges of up to £40 for PPE

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Around Town: JCC adjusts to pandemic by taking fitness equipment outdoors | News

Fitness equipment from the Goldman Sports and Wellness Complex at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center in Palo Alto is now set up outdoors. Courtesy Oshman Family JCC.

In the latest Around Town column, news about how the COVID-19 pandemic has led the Oshman Family JCC to readapt its fitness center, a local mosque to rethink an annual celebration and a five-star hotel to offer a “dream” giveaway.

COMMITTED TO FITNESS … Restaurants aren’t the only establishments that have brought their services outdoors during COVID-19. Gyms have recently joined the trend by bringing their exercise equipment out in the open, including the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center. Ellipticals, treadmills, rowing machines and other equipment from the center’s Goldman Sports and Wellness Complex are set up outside and available for members’ use. The JCC also has set up a strength-training area under a shade that includes weights and lifting stations.

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Pandemic pushes expansion of ‘hospital-at-home’ treatment

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Nurse practitioner Sadie Paez uses a stethoscope to listen to the chest of William Merry, who is recovering from pneumonia at his home, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Ipswich, Mass. As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

AP

As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

Across the U.S., “hospital at home” programs are taking off amid the pandemic, thanks to communications technology, portable medical equipment and teams of doctors, nurses, X-ray techs and paramedics. That’s reducing strains on medical centers and easing patients’ fears.

The programs represent a small slice of the roughly 35 million U.S. hospitalizations each year, but they are growing fast

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What does a Bay Area dentist’s office look like during the COVID-19 pandemic? Take a tour here

Is your dentist’s office safe? That’s one of many questions we are asking ourselves as we navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Take a tour inside a dentist’s office

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UP NEXT

The question is getting extra attention now that the World Health Organization cautioned against going for your routine dental checkups, but the California and American Dental Associations both strongly disagree with that warning.

So, what should you do about your check-up? Dr. Michael Wong in San Mateo says to find out what protocols and actions your dentist is taking to keep everyone safe. After taking a tour of Dr. Wong’s office, we found out he has a lot in place.

RELATED: Dental check-up safety debated amid COVID-19 pandemic

We first started with a look at where patients wait outside before they come in. Each patient texts when they arrive. Once inside, they sanitize their hands, put on

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The Pandemic and the Dentist

On March 16, the ADA issued the following statement:

“The American Dental Association recognizes the unprecedented and extraordinary circumstances dentists and all health care professionals face related to growing concern about COVID-19. The ADA is deeply concerned for the health and well-being of the public and the dental team. In order for dentistry to do its part to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the ADA recommends dentists nationwide postpone elective procedures for the next three weeks. Concentrating on emergency dental care will allow us to care for our emergency patients and alleviate the burden that dental emergencies would place on hospital emergency departments.”

“As health care professionals, it is up to dentists to make well-informed decisions about their patients and practices.”

Various local dental societies have issued statements echoing these recommendations. It is unlikely that these limitations would be lifted soon.

Coronavirus has a global reach, is in over 200

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