COVID19

Why A Trip To The Dentist Can Be Especially Expensive In Communities Hardest Hit By COVID-19 And Unemployment: LAist

(Photo illustration by Chava Sanchez/LAist)

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Even in a normal year, I try my best to avoid the dentist. It’s not just the physical pain, but the financial hit my bank account takes each visit.

With coronavirus raging through Southeast Los Angeles, the last place I wanted to be was in a dental chair in a Cudahy strip mall with my mouth uncovered and wide open. But that’s where I was Tuesday, staring at a wall painted like a pink princess castle, wondering how much money I was losing on this risky business.

It couldn’t be helped. I was in agony the entire weekend with a bad toothache so when Monday rolled around, I knew I needed medical attention. The problem

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Aging for Amateurs: During COVID-19, it’s still important to visit the dentist | Columnists

Four weeks ago, I wrote a column on places you won’t see me during the COVID-19 pandemic. One place that was conspicuously absent was the dentist. I hadn’t done enough research to comment on the issue of whether to seek dental care in this difficult time, but I believe I have now.

After reviewing the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention websites and talking with several local dentists, including my own family dentist, Dr. Keith Kirkland, I’m comfortable recommending regular visits for preventive care (cleaning and evaluation for tooth and gum problems) every six months, as usual.

Aging for Amateurs: Where you won’t see me during the pandemic

Of course, emergency care for dental trauma or severe pain is also recommended when needed. Talk to your dentist if you have particular concerns with visiting.

You will likely find your dentist’s office looking a little different to allow for social distancing in the waiting room and intake

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COVID-19


 

 Visit CDPH News Releases for daily COVID-19 updates.

En Español: Para obtener información en español, visite nuestra página del Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

Order of the State Public Health Officer (PDF) – May 7, 2020

Stay Home Except for Essential Needs FAQs – March 20, 2020

As of June 27, 2020, there are a total of 211,243 positive cases and 5,905 deaths in California.

For county level data, access the COVID-19 Public Dashboard.  

For skilled nursing facility data, visit Skilled Nursing Facilites: COVID-19.

For age group data, visit Cases and Deaths Associated with COVID-19 by Age Group in California.

Racial Demographics – A More Complete Picture 

The California Department of Public Health is committed to health equity
and collecting more detailed racial and ethnic data that will provide
additional understanding for determining future action. Health outcomes are
affected by forces including structural racism, poverty and the
disproportionate prevalence of

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Going to the Dentist During Covid-19: 10 Hygienist Tips

Dentists and Covid-19

Since the Covid-19 pandemic started, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association have asked dentists to forego routine and elective procedures in favor of emergency situations. This helped minimize the risk of infection to patients and staff and reduced the demand for personal protective equipment (PPE); dentists do, after all, have to get up close and personal to do their job.

Now, along with other establishments, some dental offices may be opening up for more routine procedures—the cavity that needs filling, or the cleaning you’ve been putting off. With contact comes the risk of Covid-19. “There are always risks because the coronavirus is highly infectious,” says registered dental hygienist JoAnn Gurenlian, PhD, chair for the American Dental Hygienists Association’s (ADHA) Task Force on Return to Work.

So, when should you schedule your dentist appointment? These tips will help you decide when

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Next COVID-19 challenge? Reopening America’s dentist offices

As dental offices reopen for routine care across the country — services like teeth cleanings are now allowed in 42 states — it’s not exactly business as usual for dentists and dental hygienists who mostly shut down in March as the pandemic hit. 

While the rules of reopening vary state by state, dental offices providing more than emergency care were violating guidelines set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. On Thursday, the CDC updated its guidelines and is no longer recommending that non-emergency dental care be postponed.

But because those guidelines aren’t mandatory, dentists are looking to their state guidelines for the greenlight to reopen.

“There have been some concerns raised by many of our members, as to why are we not listening to the CDC and postponing this care?” asked Matt Crespin, president of the American Dental Hygienists’ Association,

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A Dentist And A Hygienist Describe How COVID-19 Disrupts Even Routine Teeth Cleanings | KCUR 89.3

Dental offices across Kansas closed for more than a month to make sure they weren’t using up critical personal protective equipment needed at hospitals.

Now many are beginning to clean molars and bicuspids again.

Brian Grimmett of the Kansas News Service spoke with David Lawlor, a dentist, and Julie Martin, the president of the Kansas Dental Hygienists’ Association, to find out what you can expect when you go and how they’re trying to keep patients and employees safe.


The interviews were performed separately. The questions and answers have been edited for brevity and clarity.


Kansas News Service: What are the expectations for getting back up and running?

David Lawlor: We’ve been pushing patients back for six weeks. I think at first people originally we’re trying to do their best to deal with it. If it’s something I can put off for a while I will. But

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COVID-19 and mental health – CMHA National

A pandemic is a very stressful event for individuals and communities. It’s normal to feel some stress and anxiety. It’s also very common for people to display great resiliency during times of crisis.[1] 

We should remember that this is absolutely the time to lean on each other. Even if we can’t be close physically, we need to stay close emotionally. So, while you’re staying in, stay in touch with each other, and reach out if you need support.  

CMHA has put together some resources and suggestions to help support your mental health at this time of uncertainty 

We encourage you to share this page. We will be updating it regularly, so please check back for new resources 

Relevant resources: 

6 tips to respond to employee anxiety about COVID-19 

CMHA Ontario offers tips to support mental health amid concerns of COVID-19 pandemic 

Pandemic pushing your

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Czech hospital hit by cyberattack while in the midst of a COVID-19 outbreak

brno-hospital.jpg

Image via Google Street View

The Brno University Hospital in the city of Brno, Czech Republic, has been hit by a cyberattack right in the middle of a COVID-19 outbreak that is picking up steam in the small central European country.

Hospital officials have not revealed the nature of the security breach; however, the incident was deemed severe enough to postpone urgent surgical interventions, and re-route new acute patients to nearby St. Anne’s University Hospital, local media reported.

The hospital was forced to shut down its entire IT network during the incident, and two of the hospital’s other branches, the Children’s Hospital and the Maternity Hospital, were also impacted.

The infection took root at around 5 a.m. in the morning, local time, Peter Gramantik, a patient in the hospital at the time, and a security researcher with Sucuri told ZDNet via email today.

“The hospital public announcement system started to

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Searcy dentist turns to cartooning to cope with COVID-19

SEARCY, Ark. – During this time of self isolation, many people have extra time on their hands to explore hobbies. One Searcy dentist has done just that. 

Dr. Beth Patterson has turned into a cartoon illustrator to pass the time until she can reopen her practice. 

The Searcy dentist was anxious when she found out her practice had to close over coronavirus spread concerns. It left her without work for a while.

“I’ve never been without a job I worked since I was 13,” Dr. Patterson said. 

Quickly, she turned to the hobby of cartooning to cope with her changing world. She made doodles about standing in line at the unemployment office. 

“It’s really humbling to stand in line with other people who are out of work.” 

She made drawings about what it was like going to the grocery store during panic buying. 

“There were huge shelves of nothing which

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