pandemic

Millions of Brits face agonising wait to see the dentist after 10m appointments delayed by coronavirus pandemic

MILLIONS of Brits face an agonising wait to see the dentist after an estimated 10million appointments were delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The British Dental Association (BDA) has warned it could take months to clear the backlog with campaigners claiming the coronavirus crisis has been disastrous for children’s oral health.

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The BDA says it could take months to clear the backlog of patients

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The BDA says it could take months to clear the backlog of patientsCredit: Reuters

Many surgeries reopened last month after being shut during lockdown but strict rules mean they can only deal with just a few patients a day.

The BDA estimates more than 10million check-ups and treatments, such as fillings, were put on hold during the time surgeries were forced to close due to Covid-19.

Those patients who have been able to get an appointment now face charges of up to £40 for PPE

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Around Town: JCC adjusts to pandemic by taking fitness equipment outdoors | News

Fitness equipment from the Goldman Sports and Wellness Complex at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center in Palo Alto is now set up outdoors. Courtesy Oshman Family JCC.

In the latest Around Town column, news about how the COVID-19 pandemic has led the Oshman Family JCC to readapt its fitness center, a local mosque to rethink an annual celebration and a five-star hotel to offer a “dream” giveaway.

COMMITTED TO FITNESS … Restaurants aren’t the only establishments that have brought their services outdoors during COVID-19. Gyms have recently joined the trend by bringing their exercise equipment out in the open, including the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center. Ellipticals, treadmills, rowing machines and other equipment from the center’s Goldman Sports and Wellness Complex are set up outside and available for members’ use. The JCC also has set up a strength-training area under a shade that includes weights and lifting stations.

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Pandemic pushes expansion of ‘hospital-at-home’ treatment

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Nurse practitioner Sadie Paez uses a stethoscope to listen to the chest of William Merry, who is recovering from pneumonia at his home, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Ipswich, Mass. As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

AP

As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

Across the U.S., “hospital at home” programs are taking off amid the pandemic, thanks to communications technology, portable medical equipment and teams of doctors, nurses, X-ray techs and paramedics. That’s reducing strains on medical centers and easing patients’ fears.

The programs represent a small slice of the roughly 35 million U.S. hospitalizations each year, but they are growing fast

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What does a Bay Area dentist’s office look like during the COVID-19 pandemic? Take a tour here

Is your dentist’s office safe? That’s one of many questions we are asking ourselves as we navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic.

Take a tour inside a dentist’s office

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The question is getting extra attention now that the World Health Organization cautioned against going for your routine dental checkups, but the California and American Dental Associations both strongly disagree with that warning.

So, what should you do about your check-up? Dr. Michael Wong in San Mateo says to find out what protocols and actions your dentist is taking to keep everyone safe. After taking a tour of Dr. Wong’s office, we found out he has a lot in place.

RELATED: Dental check-up safety debated amid COVID-19 pandemic

We first started with a look at where patients wait outside before they come in. Each patient texts when they arrive. Once inside, they sanitize their hands, put on

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The Pandemic and the Dentist

On March 16, the ADA issued the following statement:

“The American Dental Association recognizes the unprecedented and extraordinary circumstances dentists and all health care professionals face related to growing concern about COVID-19. The ADA is deeply concerned for the health and well-being of the public and the dental team. In order for dentistry to do its part to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the ADA recommends dentists nationwide postpone elective procedures for the next three weeks. Concentrating on emergency dental care will allow us to care for our emergency patients and alleviate the burden that dental emergencies would place on hospital emergency departments.”

“As health care professionals, it is up to dentists to make well-informed decisions about their patients and practices.”

Various local dental societies have issued statements echoing these recommendations. It is unlikely that these limitations would be lifted soon.

Coronavirus has a global reach, is in over 200

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A visit to the dentist will get expensive. But is it safe to book an appointment during the pandemic?

WASHINGTON: Is it safe to visit the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic? Dentists can’t eliminate all risk, but they are taking steps to minimize the chances of spreading the coronavirus.

You’ll likely notice changes as soon as you enter the office. Many dentists have removed magazines from waiting rooms, for example, as well as some chairs to encourage social distancing.

They also are spacing out appointments to avoid crowding their offices.

You may be asked to arrive for your appointment with a facial covering and to wait in your car until equipment is cleaned and the dentist is ready. Before receiving care, you can also expect staff to take your temperature and ask about COVID-19 symptoms.

Procedures are changing, too.

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Some dentists are charging for all the extra gear, so ask in advance if you should expect extra costs.

Coronavirus is spread mainly through droplets people spray when

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At-risk doctor-nurse tandem not slowing down amid pandemic

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Healthcare Heroes

The News & Observer is telling the stories of “Healthcare Heroes,” those on the frontlines of treating coronavirus patients. Others are managing the equipment that allows those patients to be treated safely. These workers are putting their own health and the health of their families at risk every day so they can help others. Here are their stories.


Their kids tried, at least. They tried sharing concern with their parents, knowing it probably wouldn’t make a difference. Brooks and Darlene Wilkins have been practicing medicine alongside each other for a long time. They understand their responsibility.

He’s a doctor, 71 years old. She’s a nurse, and 68. At the start of the pandemic, when it became more and more certain that the novel coronavirus would not simply fade away as some had hoped, their three adult children warned them of the risks they

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Getting to the dentist during a pandemic

“I was having some pain,” she said. “With the pandemic I said, ‘I’ll just have to wait until everything’s over.'”

That Sunday, though, the pain became extreme. When she found a dentist who could see her, she learned she needed an emergency root canal.

As part of the country’s response to the Covid-19 crisis, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that dentists put off “elective procedures, surgeries and non-urgent dental visits,” allowing only emergency visits until the threat subsides.

That’s because dental work could place dentists and dental hygienists at risk for Covid-19 infection, according to the US Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The government agency includes dental health-care providers in the “very high exposure risk” category. Routine dental tools such as air-water syringes can send droplets of saliva through the air, potentially carrying the virus with them. Even recommended personal
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Your Guide To Moving During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Most of the country is holed up at home right now because of the coronavirus pandemic, but some people are choosing to relocate. It might seem like a tricky prospect to move during a global health crisis, but there are some compelling reasons to do it now.

For one, many Americans now realize that their current financial situation won’t support their current rent or mortgage payments, especially if they have lost income because of the pandemic and lockdown. They may find it necessary to downsize or move to an area with a lower cost of living.

There are nonfinancial reasons, too. “As people are spending more and more time in their current homes, they are realizing they may not be living exactly where they want to be in the next chapter of their lives,” said Marisela Cotilla, executive director of sales for ALINA Residences in Boca Raton, Florida.

Of course,

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