Safe

Yes, it’s safe to go to the dentist

  • There has been no evidence of coronavirus transmission in dental offices since many reopened in May.
  • Dentists have universal precautions in place to prevent the transmission of any infectious disease.
  • Oral health has a cascading effect on overall health, so it’s important to keep up with your cleanings and preventive dental care.

Some people might be hesitant to visit the dentist during the coronavirus pandemic, especially after the World Health Organization suggested not to in an August announcement.

However, it’s actually a low-risk activity for the patient, said Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease expert at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security.

“I would be more worried about my dentist than I would myself contracting the virus there,” Adalja told Insider.

Dentists aren’t too concerned either. After the WHO’s recommendation to delay routine dental care in certain situations due to COVID-19, the American Dental Association released a statement saying

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Is it safe to go to the dentist right now? Here’s what the experts are saying

For months after the COVID-19 pandemic hit the US, dental offices around the country closed their doors. Now that many practices have reopened, the World Health Organization (WHO) is advising people to avoid routine, non-essential dental work until transmission rates drop more. 

“WHO advises that routine non-essential oral health care – which usually includes oral health check-ups, dental cleanings, and preventive care – be delayed until there has been sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates from community transmission to cluster cases,” the warning stated. “The same applies to aesthetic dental treatments. However, urgent or emergency oral health care interventions that are vital for preserving a person’s oral functioning, managing severe pain or securing quality of life should be provided.”

The guidance comes from growing concerns around coronavirus spread through tiny respiratory droplets or aerosols. 

“The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 spreads through respiratory droplets. That’s what flies through the air when

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Stay Safe From the Coronavirus at the Dentist





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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises that dentists treat patients only after assessing them for COVID-19 and after weighing the risks of delayed care against the risk of potential viral exposure.

That’s because dental care poses clear infection risks: Dentists and hygienists must work very close to your face and use tools that may spray droplets. “Dental staff will now be wearing additional personal protective equipment, such as face shields, gowns, and masks,” says Chad Gehani, D.D.S., president of the American Dental Association.

Your dental office may also want you to fill out a screening form (asking about recent travel, social interactions, and health history) and do a temperature check prior to an appointment. Some practices may have “virtual check-ins,” where patients wait in their car, sign in for the appointment on

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A visit to the dentist will get expensive. But is it safe to book an appointment during the pandemic?

WASHINGTON: Is it safe to visit the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic? Dentists can’t eliminate all risk, but they are taking steps to minimize the chances of spreading the coronavirus.

You’ll likely notice changes as soon as you enter the office. Many dentists have removed magazines from waiting rooms, for example, as well as some chairs to encourage social distancing.

They also are spacing out appointments to avoid crowding their offices.

You may be asked to arrive for your appointment with a facial covering and to wait in your car until equipment is cleaned and the dentist is ready. Before receiving care, you can also expect staff to take your temperature and ask about COVID-19 symptoms.

Procedures are changing, too.

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Some dentists are charging for all the extra gear, so ask in advance if you should expect extra costs.

Coronavirus is spread mainly through droplets people spray when

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Is It Safe To Go Back To The Dentist Despite Surging Coronavirus Cases? : Shots

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients.

Elaine Thompson/AP


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Elaine Thompson/AP

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients.

Elaine Thompson/AP

Add dental visits to the list of services you can book now or shortly as cities, counties and states continue to modify their months-long stay-at-home orders aimed at reducing COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations.

Dental offices were largely shuttered across the United States after being advised in March by the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to close their practices to all but emergency care. Many closed entirely.

The hope was that by allowing dentists to continue to treat serious cases — such as

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Is It Safe To Go Back To The Dentist, Despite Surging Coronavirus Cases? : Shots

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures, and are working under updated CDC guidance regarding the coronavirus pandemic. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of PPE she wears when treating patients, among other precautions.

Elaine Thompson/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Elaine Thompson/AP

Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures, and are working under updated CDC guidance regarding the coronavirus pandemic. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of PPE she wears when treating patients, among other precautions.

Elaine Thompson/AP

Add dental visits to the list of services you can book now or shortly, as cities, counties and states continue to modify their months-long stay at home orders aimed at reducing COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations.

Dental offices were largely shuttered across the United States after being advised in March by the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Read More

Is It Safe to Go to the Dentist Again?

At Dr. Todd Bertman’s office, the receptionist wears a plastic face shield. So do the hygienist and the nine doctors in the practice in Manhattan’s East Village.

Dr. Bertman reopened the office two weeks ago after closing it in March in response to the coronavirus pandemic. In another change from the past, he has switched from ultrasonic cleaners that spray water and saliva into the air to laser instruments.

The dentists and hygienists wear head-to-toe personal protective equipment that they change between appointments, a time-consuming, awkward ritual that requires them to take off booties, gowns, goggles, masks, gloves and the shields and replace them with clean ones.

“It’s like changing out of a spacesuit,” Dr. Bertman said. “It’s annoying as hell but this is what it kind of comes down to until we find a vaccine.”

As of June 19, every state had allowed dentists’ offices to reopen for all

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How to Prevent Medicine Abuse in Your Home: Safe Storage & Disposal

It’s up to all of us to take action against medicine abuse. The best place to start is in your own home by storing medications safely and securely, and by talking with your kids about the dangers of medicine abuse.

Mind Your Meds

Two-thirds of teens and young adults who report abuse of prescription medicine are getting it from friends, family and acquaintances. Make sure the young people in your life don’t have access to any medications in your home. Follow these three steps to monitor, secure and properly dispose of unused and expired prescription and over-the-counter medicine in your home.

Step 1: Monitor

How aware are you of the prescription medications currently in your home? Would you know if some of your pills were missing? From this day forward, make sure you can honestly answer yes.

Start by taking note of how many pills are in each of your

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